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Recipe: Heart-healthy Avocado, Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Avocado, black bean and corn salsa recipe

Rich-and-creamy avocados are more than the prime ingredient in guacamole. They’re also a great addition to your heart-healthy diet.
 
With about 20 vitamins and minerals per serving, avocados are a nutrient-dense food – packed with lots of nutritional value in relatively few calories (about 60 calories per serving  –  or one-fourth of a whole avocado). And, they are sodium-free, high in potassium and magnesium, and monounsaturated fat, all of which are important to heart health.

Avocados are sometimes referred to as “Alligator Pears” because of their pear-like shape and tough green skin. There are thousands of varieties, but Hass — with its distinctive rough skin that turns nearly black when ripe — is the most popular. Others, such as Fuerte, have smooth green skin.

All avocados are ripe and ready to eat when they “give” slightly as you gently squeeze them in the palm of your hand.

For this recipe, use avocados that are soft but firm, so they can be easily cut into cubes.

Serve it as a dip, a side dish or topping for chicken or fish, or as a tasty chopped salad atop a bed of your favorite leafy greens.

Avocado, Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Serves 8   

  • 2 large (8-ounce) ripe avocados, washed, peeled, pitted and cut into ½-inch cubes
  • ¼ cup vinaigrette salad dressing
  • ¼ cup green onions, washed and sliced 
  • 1 15-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup frozen corn, thawed and drained
  • ½ cup red bell pepper, washed and diced  

In large bowl, whisk together salad dressing and green onions.  Stir in black beans, corn and red pepper.  Add avocado and toss gently. 

NUTRITION INFORMATION (per ½ cup serving):  150 calories, 8 grams fat, 17 grams carbohydrate, 190 mg sodium

Recipe modified from avocadocentral.com

About Karen Stutzman RD

I am a Ascension Via Christi Hospital clinical dietitian and certified diabetes educator. I received my master’s degree in dietetics and nutrition from University of Kansas Medical Center. When I’m not working, I enjoy feeding and watching birds.