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Winter is the time for sinus infections

how to treat a sinus infection

By now, many of you moms out there have realized that a very special time of year is upon us. I wish I was referring to the holidays, but unfortunately that's not the case. I'm referring to the wintertime increase in respiratory infections such as the common cold, ear infections, strep throat and, of course, influenza. One of the most common reasons people go to the doctor this time of year is for sinus infections, or rhinosinusitis. This term is a combination of sinusitis (inflammation of the lining of the sinuses) and rhinitis (inflammation of the lining of the nose). Symptoms include nasal congestion, pain and pressure in the face, headaches and cough. The most common cause is viral infection, not bacterial infection as many people believe. Viral rhinosinusitis can progress to bacterial rhinosinusitis, but this happens in less than two percent of cases. Bacterial rhinosinusitis can also occur in people with uncontrolled allergies.

Teen turns life-threatening accident into a whole new life

The glare of the afternoon sun, the unbuckled seat belt, the terrible timing. Like most car accidents, it was a horrible collection of circumstances that left Ashlee Johnston, now 17, in a coma and fighting for her life. It was Friday, Sept. 3, 2010 — just three days before Ashlee’s sweet 16. 

Mercy sleep lab helps patients get a good night's sleep

After moving from El Paso to Manhattan this past December, Lisa Blum was exhausted. And that was no big surprise. A stay-at-home mom with two young kids, Blum has a busy life.

But she knew her problems began even before the big move.

“I’d been very tired. It started back in 2008, when I gained some weight,” she said. “I knew I had sleep apnea, but I just kept thinking, ‘It will go away.’”

Rediscovering quality of life after knee replacement surgery

Virgil Warren has been active all his life. As a child, he was into sports. In middle age, he played basketball and regularly jogged four to five miles a day. In early retirement, he picked up roofing and remodeling work. But as he grew older, all that activity eventually led to knee pain.

“I started to jog every other day. Then when that got to be too much, I did half as far. Then I had to quit doing it altogether,” Warren said. “I always prided myself on trying to keep fit. It was pretty hard not to be active.”

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